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News diary 16-22 September: John Humphrys expected to bid farewell to Radio 4 Today as David Cameron publishes memoirs

Foresight News provides a look-ahead to the key events that need to be in your news diary for next week… 

On Monday, Prime Minister Boris Johnson heads to Luxembourg for a highly-anticipated meeting with outgoing European Commission President Jean-Claude Juncker.

The meeting is the pair’s first since Johnson took over from Theresa May, and comes amid contradictory reports on whether there might be movement towards an agreement that would avert either a no-deal Brexit on 31 October, or an extension to the UK’s departure from the EU.

In Ankara, Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan hosts three-way talks on Syria with his Russian and Iranian counterparts, Vladimir Putin and Hassan Rouhani.

Erdogan told Turkish media that the meeting’s main focus would be the fate of Idlib, the last rebel stronghold. Erdogan is likely to press Putin and Rouhani to use their influence on Syrian President Bashar al-Assad to avert the kind of operation that would almost certainly lead to a new wave of refugees heading toward Turkey.

Tuesday marks the biggest test to the authority of Boris Johnson’s premiership to date as the Supreme Court begins considering challenges to his prorogation of parliament.

The hearing follows defeats for John Major and Gina Miller in the High Court and a similar litigation in Northern Ireland, but victory for a group of cross party MPs at the Scottish Court of Session has thrown open the debate over the Prime Minister’s true intentions. The hearing is expected to run over several days.

US President Donald Trump begins a rare visit to California, where he is scheduled to attend fundraisers in the San Francisco Bay Area and Beverly Hills as he continues his 2020 re-election campaign.

The trip follows a recent visit to the state by Trump administration officials searching for sites to relocate California’s homeless population, prompting speculation that Trump may discuss the issue during his visit.

Israelis head to the polls for the second time this year after Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu was unable to form a government following the April election.

Polling suggests that even if his Likud party does secure the most seats, he is unlikely to gain an outright majority and will have to form a coalition if he is to remain in power. As was the case in the April elections, Netanyahu has tacked right during the campaign, notably vowing last week to annex part of the West Bank if he is returned to power.

On Wednesday, Londonderry Magistrates Court hears the case of a former member of the armed forces who is charged with murder in relation to the 1972 Bloody Sunday killings.

Known only as Soldier F, the trooper is accused of murdering James Wray and William McKinney, and faces charges of the attempted murders of four others. Soldier F is not expected to appear in person for the hearing.

Jacob Rees-Mogg is at London’s Cadogan Hall to take part in a discussion on Brexit with The Telegraph’s chief political correspondent Christopher Hope.

The conversation is likely to focus on the lingering prospect of a no-deal withdrawal from the European Union, with questions on the forced publication of Operation Yellowhammer documents likely to loom large. Don’t expect the Leader of the House of Commons to take any personal criticisms lying down, though.

On Thursday, all eyes will be on former Prime Minister David Cameron as his autobiography For The Record hits shops. The book, which claims to offer a “frank and personal account of his time in Number 10”, coincides with the airing of a BBC documentary on the former Prime Minister’s political career.

Cameron’s media round is expected to include an interview on Radio 4’s Today programme, which will reportedly mark John Humphrys’ (pictured) last day in the presenter’s chair.

The OECD publishes its Interim Economic Outlook report to present its near-term projections for the global economy. Recent global indicators have proved sobering; the International Monetary Fund warned of “sluggish” economic growth in July, global manufacturing data shows the sector in the grip of a notable downturn, and the UK and Germany have both warned that their economies are teetering on the brink of a recession.

The ongoing trade war between the United States and China will also do little to allay fears of a gradual worldwide economic slowdown.

Kicking off a big week for climate activism, students and workers from around the world strike on Friday to protest inaction on climate change. The strike, hosted by international environmental organization 350.org, sets off a week of protests which will culminate in an Earth Strike on 27 September.

The German government is also expected to unveil a package of climate change reforms, a pivotal moment that could make-or-break the coalition between Angela Merke’s CDU and the SPD.

The Rugby World Cup kicks off in Tokyo, as hosts Japan take on Russia. New Zealand head into the tournament as favourites to lift the Webb Ellis Cup for a fourth time and would also become the first team to win on three consecutive occasions. The tournament runs for six weeks, with a final in Yokohama on 2 November.

Saturday marks the start of the Labour Party Autumn Conference, though the day’s main attraction will be leader Jeremy Corbyn’s speech at the Momentum-organised fringe conference, The World Transformed.

Shadow Chancellor John McDonnell has also been confirmed to attend, and the event is likely to be a key boost of support for Corbyn, who has recently come under fire from senior members of Labour over his stance on Brexit and a general election.

Meanwhile, Brexit standard-bearer Nigel Farage joins keynote speakers in Wales during the Welsh leg of The Brexit Party Conference Tour.

The tour comes amid further rejection from Number 10 of a possible pact between the Brexit Party and the Conservatives, with a statement saying Boris Johnson “has been clear” that there will be no such agreement.

England get their Rugby World Cup campaign underway on Sunday morning (ko 11.15am UK time) as they take on Tonga in Sapporo. Eddie Jones’ side have enjoyed a run of form in the build up to the tournament, having lost just one of their last seven matches. The highlight of the day’s action though is the Pool A clash between Ireland and Scotland which gets underway at 8.45am UK time.

Sunday also sees the 71st Emmy Awards ceremony. Notable nominees include Game of Thrones, which has received a record-setting 32 nominations for its eighth season, Chernobyl (19 nominations), and Amazon’s Fleabag (11 nominations), with writer and actor Phoebe Waller-Bridge being nominated for five awards.

The news diary is provided in association with Foresight News.

Picture: BBC

Comments

1 thought on “News diary 16-22 September: John Humphrys expected to bid farewell to Radio 4 Today as David Cameron publishes memoirs”

  1. The Syrian piece is pure propaganda, Turkey along with the so called coalition are responsible for the refugee issue as they support Al-Qaeda and seek the destruction of Syria.
    How can you plug Mr Cameron’s book given his responsibility for destroying Libya, murdering thousands of civilians? He, like Mr Blair should be facing a war crimes tribunal.
    How much longer can you dress up global recession? For as long as you believe ‘cooked’ statistics.
    As always more slight of hand from Foresightfakenews.

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