Two deaths in Iraq bring the total journalists and media workers killed so far this year to 22

The deaths of a reporter and a photographer in Iraq bring the number of journalists and media workers killed doing their job this year to 22, according to the International Federation of Journalists.

The total includes nine journalists who were killed in a single day in Paris at the offices of Charlie Hebdo on 7 January.

Adnan Abdul Razzaq, an Iraqi photographer working for the Sama Mosul channel, was allegedly murdered by Islamic State in Mosul last weekend.

Reporter Ali Ansari (pictured above) was fatally wounded when caught in crossfire between the Iraqi army and Islamic State in Mykdadyah on 23 January, the IFJ reports.

Ansari was a reporter for the Iraqi Al-Ghadeer television channel. He was recently honoured by the IJS for his courage in reporting on the Iraq conflict.

Journalist Mustafa Hamid and cameraman Qusay Sahib, both from Iraqiya state television, were also wounded in the battle.

Jim Boumelha, president of the IFJ, said: “We extend our condolences to these killed journalists' family and friends.”

Boumelha added: "The escalation of violence that has now hit the Middle East is getting unbearable.

“This latest outrage underlines the massive efforts needed to create the best conditions for journalists so they can safely do their job."

IJS president Moaiad Al Lamy urged all journalists working in the country to exercise maximum caution while performing their professional duty.

According to the IFJ there have been 22 journalists or media staff killed around the world in 2015 so far, all the results of targeted or crossfire killings.

After France, the country with the second highest death toll so far this year is South Sudan where five journalists and media staff have been killed.

In 2014, the number of journalists and media staff killed across the world was 135 – according to the IFJ. Of these, 118 were said to have been targeted or crossfire killings.

The country with the highest number of media deaths in 2014 was Pakistan, where 14 journalists and media staff were killed, followed by Syria (12 ). Eight journalists were killed doing their job in Iraq last year, according to the IFJ.

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