Top Scot cries foul over BBC and ITV's pro-English bias in World Cup

By Hamish Mackay

Scotland's First Minister Jack McConnell has
attacked the BBC and ITV for being too biased in favour of England in
their World Cup coverage.

McConnell's attack came on the eve of England's match against Trinidad and Tobago in Nurumberg.

Scotland's
First Minister had already caused controversy by refusing to support
England in the World Cup. Instead he declared his backing for Trinidad
and Tobago and any other teams with Scotland-based players.

On
the Real Radio World Cup phone-in, McConnell said: "I think there is a
problem with the way some of the UK – because they are UK – stations
handle the coverage of major sporting events – particularly the World
Cup.

"They seem to forget from time to time that they are meant
to represent the whole of the country – not just one part of it. I hope
perhaps they will listen to a bit of pressure and be more reasonable
with their coverage."

Meanwhile the Scottish tabloids continue to take an anti-English line in their news coverage of the cup.

The
Scottish Sun, which is carrying dispatches from Port-of-Spain, is
cock-a-hoop that its World Cup song about Trinidad and Tobago hero
Jason Scotland has entered the UK Top 40 this week.

And news of
the song, penned by Scottish Sun reader Richard Melville, was splashed
all over the front page of Trinidad and Tobago's biggest newspaper –
The Newsday.

The Scottish Daily Record today carries a front-page
blurb for a free £5 World Cup bet with betfair.com which makes no bones
about where its loyalties lie.

The blurb boldly emphasised that
the £5 bet could be placed on Trinidad and Tobago followed by a line in
smaller type in brackets declaring: (Or England, if you really must).

An
inside box, carrying the detail of how to place the bet, said: "Today
Scotland – Jason Scotland that is – takes on England in the World Cup
and Trinidad and Tobago will have the full backing of the Tartan Army
when they play Beckham and co."

 

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