The Times revives quarterly mag for its 'most affluent' readers - Luxx

luxxx

The Times has revived its quarterly lifestyle magazine Luxx with former Esquire editor Jeremy Langmead as editor.

Langmead will continue in his role as brand and content director of shopping website Mr Porter.

According to publisher News UK, Luxx “will provide the most affluent readers of The Times with a revamped offering to ensure that they stay well-informed about the best products, services and innovations available in the luxury market”.

It claims that The Times and Sunday Times reach more households earning at least £150,000 than any other UK newspapers.

News UK chief executive Rebekah Brooks said: “We’re proud of the affluent and influential audience that The Times and The Sunday Times have. The decision to bring back Luxx to The Times addresses the needs of our most affluent readers.

“We know that our readers believe it is worth paying for quality, and they trust us to keep them informed on all matters of luxury with the same integrity, authority and sound judgment as Times journalism.”

Luxx was launched in 2007 but dropped by The Times as a quarterly title in 2013.

The first revived edition of Luxx will be distributed free with The Times on Saturday, 3 December, 2016.

Comments

3 thoughts on “The Times revives quarterly mag for its 'most affluent' readers - Luxx”

  1. This is a preposterous idea. I spent a lifetime in regional journalism having quotes from my scoops being reprinted by the nationals without any attribution – and I revelled in the wider audience! I knew I was the top dog and so did my editor; that was all that mattered. Today, many nationals – notably the Daily Mail – will say that ‘Mr Snot told the Invercockaleekie Twice Yearly Courier’ this that or the other. But who cares? Not me – or the readers. He/ she said it – or they didn’t. Often tinpot weeklies will have ripped off a parish magazine in the first place – without any attribution. Stop being so precious.

  2. “We know that our readers believe it is worth paying for quality…”. Why, then, relentlessly promote discount Times subscription deals?

  3. Will this supplement only be included in copies sold to “the most affluent readers”, or also in those bought by uninfluential riff-raff? If the former, it might be logistically difficult to differentiate would-be customers – by individual means-testing at the newsagent’s or supermarket checkout?

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