Sundays suffer in readership survey figures

National Sunday newspapers were among the biggest losers in National Readership Survey figures released today, with the sector as a whole down 3.49 per cent on the same figure last year to 33.2 million – a loss of 1.2 million readers.

The NRS figures, for the third quarter of 2007, estimate that The People’s readership dipped 12 per cent to 1.6 million and the Sunday Telegraph saw a decline of 11 per cent to 1.75 million.

The Observer, The Sunday Times and The Mail on Sunday all saw declines of less than five per cent while the News of the World saw a one per cent rise.

The survey estimates an overall national readership decline of 1.9 per cent year on year for the main national daily and Sunday papers.

The daily national newspaper market took a slight year on year dip of 0.22 per cent, a loss of 73,000 readers. The Independent gained an estimated six per cent gain to 787,000 while The Daily Star mirrored its print sale success with a rise of 10 per cent.

The Racing Post, recently sold by Trinity Mirror to Irish investment firm FL Partners, saw an estimated eight per cent readership rise to 195,000.

Associated Newspapers’ national free paper Metro’s readership rose by 30 per cent. The London Evening Standard lost an estimated 141,000 readers to 689,000, a loss of 17 per cent.

In the regional sector, Newsquest‘s Glasgow-based titles all took estimated year on year readership hits: the Evening Times was down 22 per cent to 182,000, the Sunday Herald was down to 202,000 to 22 per cent and the daily Herald was down 10 per cent to 270,000.

Johnston Press‘s flagship title The Scotsman gained 21,000 readers to achieve an estimated readership of 229,000, a 10 per cent rise.

NRS data is based on a continuous survey of 36,000 readers – the figures are estimates and do not represent actual readership, but are seen as inlfluential by some media buyers and advertisers.

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