Ruby awards unveiled

BBC news teams across the UK are being invited to compete for the coveted Ruby Television Awards 2003, which aim to recognise technical and editorial excellence in news broadcasting in the Nations & Regions.

The director of BBC Nations & Regions, Pat Loughrey, will launch the awards on 23 March, 2004.

BBC Wales will host next year’s awards at the Millennium Stadium in Cardiff. As guest of honour, BBC director general Greg Dyke will present the awards and Huw Edwards will present the event.

The judges, who are yet to be confirmed, will be highly respected BBC broadcasters and producers.

There are 11 categories for news teams to compete for, including three new ones – best live sequence/outside broadcast, best coverage of a running story and best sports coverage.

They are open to all Nations & Regions staff working in daily television news.

Loughrey said: “The Ruby Awards are a chance to recognise the true extent of the contribution that these programmes, and the Nations & Regions news teams who produce them, make to the BBC’s news output.

“I was delighted with the positive response to the launch of the Ruby Television News Awards last year – it was a memorable salute to 40 years of regional news. I’m delighted that BBC Wales is to host the second Ruby Awards.

“This is an opportunity to showcase all that’s best in our television news output.”

Each of the corporation’s 16 Nations & Regions news programmes will be invited to submit one entry in each of the 11 categories. The closing date for entries is Thursday, 11 December.

The award categories are as follows: Outstanding camera work; Outstanding craft skills in postproduction; Broadcast of diversity issues; PDP/video journalist; Best live sequence/outside broadcast; Best television news journalist; Exclusive story; Best coverage of a running story; Sports coverage; Presenter; Best evening news programme.

Comments
No comments to display

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

two + 4 =

CLOSE
CLOSE