Press Gazette August edition: Journalism technology wars, 16-page guide to travel journalism, Anna Botting's newsreading masterclass

The August edition of Press Gazette magazine is packed with 80 pages of tips, training, advice, news, analysis, wit, wisdom and insight aimed at anyone with a serious interest in journalism.

The magazine content is only available to subscribers.

Here’s my six-of-the-best from the current edition:

The second (at least) coming of AOL UK. The company’s promise to become the biggest hirer of journalists in the world this year has not materialised on this side of the pond – plans for a new UK political news service have been shelved. But Peter Kirwan finds that the content portal does have big plans for the UK – including the  launch of content-farm syle operation Seed.com.

Regular columnist Alex Thomson on the trail of Raoul Moat:  “One we’d been told he’d threatened to kill members of the public if he encountered inaccurate reporting, we took the request for a media blackout seriously.”

Former Rotherham Advertiser reporter Cherry Wilson on the story behind a scoop which went around the world – how a man had one of his teeth inserted into his eye to restore his sight.

Sky’s Anna Botting provides a masterclass on reading the news:  “As the world disintegrates in stress around you, the trick is to adopt a Zen-like calmness on your face, smile and remember why you’re there.”

Leading business to business editors explain why, despite leading the field in making money from online, they still believe there is life left in the print title. Says Retail Week editor Tim Danaher:  “For big interviews and in-depth analysis, print is still the medium our readers prefer.”

Former Guardian computer editor Jack Schofield on his amazing technological journey: “When I first joined The Guardian in 1983 I put a computer on my desk – someone came around and asked, is that a television?”

In addition to the main magazine there is also a free 16-page guide to travel journalism featuring interviews with most of the leading travel editors and the inside story on the murky world of press trips:

“At least two travel publications claim to get round the ethics of free travel by adopting a ‘no freebies’ policy. But as one PR put it: ‘Those who don’t take freebies still get a deal.'”

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