Back Issues 15.04.04

EVENING CITIZEN CLOSES

These were the desolate scenes as the Beaver-brook-ownedEvening Citizen in Glasgow finally died and merged with the Evening Times. The paper closed after 110 years but failed to come out on its last planned day because of an industrial dispute. An action committee had demanded front-page space for a statement about a hoped-for new paper produced by a workers' co-operative. Editor Ian Brodie said the statement was unacceptable. Printing was stopped on the orders of the management.

GOOD NEWS FOR TELEGRAPH

Sales of The Daily Telegraph were booming. Latest figures showed that in March 1974, the newspaper averaged sales of 1,456,182 up 33,000 on the same month in the previous year. Sales of the paper are now just over 900,000.

AS SASSIN'S PICTURES WERE 'OBSCENE'

The Press Council upheld a complaint against The Sunday Times for publishing pictures by Benjamin Mendoza, who had tried to assassinate the Pope at Manila airport, under the headline "Art and the Assassin". The council, which said it did not usually rule on matters of taste, described the pictures as "violent and obscene". Its ruling said: "The council considers the illustrations to be so repugnant that it was an error of judgement to publish them."

NEWS OF VIOLENCE 'FEEDS THE SICK MIND'

Clean-up TV campaigner Mary Whitehousecalled on broadcasters to reconsider their policyof reporting violent events. "We are not suggesting censorship of the news. We are suggesting that over-explicit visual presentation of violence, including that of accidents, feeds the sick mind and tends to normalise such violence even in the minds of ordinary people," she claimed.

SATCHWELL JOINS EVENING POST

A long-haired and bearded Bob Satchwell was appointed district chief reporter at the Lancashire Evening Post. He went on to Fleet Street with the News of the World before being made editor of the Cambridge Evening News. He is now executive director of the Society of Editors.

NATIONAL PRESS ROLL OF HONOUR

A host of famous journalists was featured on the front of Press Gazette after the winners of the IPC National Press Awards were announced. Journalist of the year was Adam Raphael of The Guardian for his series on labour conditions in South Africa. International reporter of the year was Peter Niesewand, also from The Guardian, for his reports from Rhodesia. Columnist of the year was shared by Bernard Levin of The Times and Keith Waterhouse of the Daily Mirror. Alexander Walker was critic of the year, while Daily Mail editor David English, received a special award for the performance of his paper over the past year. Provincial journalist of the year was Frank Branston of the Bedfordshire Times, who went on to launch Bedfordshire on Sunday and is now the elected Mayor of Bedford.

'OBSCURE' PAPER REVEALS NAMES

An Old Bailey judge took a "grave view" of Paul Foot revealing in Socialist Worker the identities of Mr Y and Mr Z in the Janie Jones blackmail trial. The director of public prosecutions was asked to decide what action to take after the article was referred to him by Judge Alan KingHamilton, who described Socialist Worker as "fortunately obscure".

ASPINALL ON CRIMINAL CHARGES

Sunday People reporter Trevor Aspinall spent a weekend in jail while on an investigation. He was charged at Dunstable Magistrates' Court, with two other men, with conspiracy to obtain automatic pistols, a rifle and ammunition. The court heard the charges were "an attempt, unwitting or not," by the police to "shackle the press".

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