Mosley sex party case: Myler takes the stand

Colin Myler, editor of the News of the World, gave evidence today in the Max Mosley sex orgy privacy hearing and told the court he believed the story was one of “legitimate public interest and one that I believe was legitimately published”.

On the allegation that the paper fabricated the Nazi aspect to the story, Myler answered: “Absolutely not true.”

The hearing was adjourned after Myler began his evidence and he is to continue testifying.

One of the women involved in a sado-masochistic session with motorsport boss Max Mosley rejected an allegation today that there had been Nazi role-play.

The woman, who cannot be identified for legal reasons, took the stand at the High Court as a witness in Mosley’s landmark breach of privacy action against the News of the World.

Identified only as Woman D, she told Mr Justice Eady during the second day of the case in London that what had taken place was a “prison fantasy”.

“Woman D”, who is in her 20s and a student, said: “I did not see anything Nazi.”

Mosley, the 68-year-old son of the 1930s Fascist leader Sir Oswald Mosley, has said: “A Nazi theme would be abhorrent to me – and I suspect that none of the women would wish to take part should anyone suggest such a theme.”

Mosley says his life was devastated by the expose of what the newspaper called a “sick Nazi orgy with five hookers” and is asking for an unprecedented award of punitive exemplary damages.

News Group Newspapers strongly contests the action and argues that publication was justified in the public interest.

Woman D said the newspaper’s description of what happened on March 28 was “absurd”.

The description of herself and the other women involved as “hookers and prostitutes” was “offensive”.

Woman D, who has a website for “like-minded people”, said that on March 28 she felt she was “amongst friends, doing something I enjoy and all those involved enjoy”.

She said she has known Mr Mosley for about 18 months and met him at a party arranged by Woman A and was introduced to him as “Mike”.

“Since that first experience with the claimant I have seen him a number of times and we have forged a friendship.”

Referring to the newspaper article, Woman D said: “I am particularly appalled at the accusations that our scenarios had any Nazi connotation or overtones. No Nazi images, uniforms or material were used.”

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