Monthly mental health magazine Happiful aims to fill 'gap in women's wellness sector'

A monthly magazine that focuses on mental health, is to launch on newsstands on 1 October.

Happiful currently has a free distribution of 15,000 to hair salons, spas, health clubs, hotels, airports and health waiting rooms – after “soft-launching” as a free title in March.

It is to launch at newsagents with a cover price of £4 and an initial print run of 80,000 copies.

Editor Jake Hamilton told the Press Gazette: “Our research showed there was a gap in the women’s wellness sector for an informative and accessible magazine that talked openly about mental health issues.”

“The overriding goal of Happiful magazine is to promote better mental health and prevent poor mental health. We want to topple the stigma of mental health in UK society, through compassion and understanding.”

Happiful magazine employs five editorial staff, and also has a monthly ‘Advisory Panel’ of psychotherapists, counsellors, life coaches, hypnotherapists and holistic therapists who advise on the editorial content.

“Happiful approaches mental health in a mainstream, mass appeal way. We look and read like a lifestyle magazine that talks openly about mental health in a fresh, engaging and relatable voice,” said Hamilton.

“Our stories talk about the big things in life that genuinely matter to people – love, family, relationships, sex, death, work, society. Readers instinctively know where we’re coming from. We speak their language.”

Comments

2 thoughts on “Monthly mental health magazine Happiful aims to fill 'gap in women's wellness sector'”

  1. I want to subscribe to this!!
    Seen it at my friends hair salon yesterday.
    I am coming up to 50 and not feeling quite myself at mo..
    It really touched on so many things..

  2. —-We want to topple the stigma of mental health in UK society, through compassion and understanding ??

    If so, do not cede authority to people who direct that term. Work to end the prejudice. That term is both ore accurate, and paces the onus on people practicing the prejudice.

    “Stigma” places it on the victim. That ought not be your choice.

    Harold A. Maio, retired mental health editor

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