Back Issues 19.08.04

CHIPP MAKES STAND

Press Association editor-in-chief David Chipp was taking a stand over the status of journalists and refusing to cover a London Guildhall dinner at which Prime Minister Harold Wilson, Opposition leader Edward Heath and Liberal leader Jeremy Thorpe were speaking. Chipp had refused to cover the meeting after being told that all reporters were to be fed in the Crypt and then taken into the Main Hall to report the speeches. He told Press Gazette: “What worried me was the discourtesy. Authority is always telling us that journalists should be courteous. I agree, but courtesy should be reciprocal. We are not prepared to be considered an afterthought, we have a job to do.”

GAME ON FOR BOYS’ SOCCER MAG

The first issue of IPC’s soccer weekly for boys, Shoot, rolled off the press at East Midland Litho Printers.The picture shows production manager, Denys Harley; Shoot managing editor Jack Le Grand; assistant editor Pat Brookman; and assistant to publisher, Ken Roscoe, looking at the launch issue.

UNDER FIRE IN ULSTER

This dramatic front page picture in Press Gazette showed Daily Sketch reporter Philip Jordon filing copy during the troubles in Northern Ireland. Other journalists and a ‘B’ Special are seen sheltering behind the telephone box from sniper fire. The picture was taken by Bill Lovelace of the Daily Express.

AL AN CHANGES HIS TUNE

A new trade paper for the music industry was launched by Longacre Press, part of IPC’s Business Press division. Called Music Business Weekly, it was edited by Alan Walsh. He was a former editor of Melody Maker.

WE NEED ONE ORGANISATION

A call for a new organisation capable of speaking with authority on behalf of the press, was proposed by former Picture Post editor Tom Hopkinson. Writing in Press Gazette, Hopkinson suggested it be named the National Council of the British Press. He said that it would speak out on day-to-day issues which concerned all branches of the industry. Hopkinson claimed the new council couldconduct research and set-up a first class cuttings and picture library preserving the history of the press.

CZECHS BAN PRESS VISAS

The Czechoslovak Embassy in London had clamped down on journalists by refusing visa applications. The move came on the eve of the anniversary of the Warsaw Pact invasion on 21 August. Two journalists , Michael Hornsby of The Times and Kenneth Ames, of The Economist, who got into Czechoslovakia were struck by riot police while covering demonstrations.

FOUR-STAR COMMENT ON A ONESTAR REVIEW

Actor and director Richard Attenborough hit back at a bad review of his film “Oh! What a Lovely War” in the Western Mail by critic Tony Austin. Attenborough objected to the headline “Oh! What an Insignificant War,” and disagreed that his anti-war picture was old hat. The Western Mail praised Attenborough for making himself available for an interview.

200 TRY TO COVER INQUEST

More than 200 journalists from all over the world had applied to attend the inquest at Martha’s Vineyard into the death of Mary Jo Kopechne, the secretary who died after her boss Senator Edward Kennedy’s car crashed.

 

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