Back Issues 17.06.04

KIRBY JOINS EVENING NEWS

Lou Kirby had been named editor-elect of the London Evening News, which was planning to switch from broadsheet to tabloid in the autumn of 1974. Kirby was deputy editor of the Daily Mail.

PRESS CLUB GETS ROYAL TREATMENT

The Queen Mother officially opened the new premises of the London Press Club at the International Press Centre. She was made the first honorary lady life member of the club.

STANDARD CELEBRATES BUMPER ISSUE

Evening Standard editor Charles Wintour was looking far from chilly on the front of Press Gazette. In fact he was positively beaming. The reason? The Standard had just published its biggest issue, running to 64 pages.

HEATH IS NOT AMUSED

An untypical photograph of former Prime Minister Edward Heath showed him without his famed toothy grin. He was reading the front page of the Aberdeen Press & Journal held up by local MP Russell Fairgrieve at Aberdeen Airport. The paper had reported the MP’s speech on Aberdeen’s place in oil development.

NUJ DEMANDS PLACE ON SELECTION PANEL

The editorship of the Cambridge Evening News is currently being advertised and 30 years ago the job was also up for grabs after Nicholas Herbert had moved on to become editorial director of Westminster Press. This gave the paper’s NUJ chapel the opportunity to demand that it should have a say in choosing the new editor. It asked for a clause to be included in the house agreement that would let the chapel be represented on future selection panels for the editor’s post. The chapel also stressed the new editor should be a member of the NUJ and uphold the union’s code of conduct. This is unlikely to be a requirement demanded by Iliffe management when selecting Colin Grant’s replacement.

STRIKE HITS RADIO TIMES

Industrial action by Sogat which had stopped the Daily Mirror, Financial Times and The Times spread to magazines. Radio Times lost a complete run of 3.5 million copies.

It also hit IPC’s three bigsellers – Woman, Woman’s Realm and Woman’s Weekly.

POST IMAGES ASSIST POLICE INQUIRY

Police called for aerial pictures taken by the Yorkshire Post of the destruction caused by the explosion that ripped through the Flixborough chemicals plant on Humberside to be used at the inquest and inquiry. Journalists covering the disaster, in which 28 workers were killed, praised Humberside police for the way the press had been handled. A press conference took place on a Sunday at which the management of the Flixborough plant and safety experts were present. John Chartres of The Times told Press Gazette: “Reporters remarked that police liaison was an excellent blueprint for any future major disaster.”

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