Allister Heath appointed new Sunday Telegraph editor as Ian MacGregor takes on 'emeritus' role

Sunday Telegraph editor Ian MacGregor is leaving to take on a new Editor Emeritus role that will see him “act as a bridge between the editorial and commercial arms of the business”.

Macgregor has spent a decade as editor of the weekly title, taking up the role in 2007.

He is being replaced by deputy editor Allister Heath (pictured), who will also continue as head of business for the paper.

MacGregor’s new role at the Telegraph will include “leading the company’s editorial campaigning on industry matters and helping to protect media freedom”, a spokesperson said.

He will also oversee the development of future editorial talent, including the paper’s graduate training scheme.

MacGregor said: “Editing The Sunday Telegraph for the last ten years has been an honour and a privilege.

“I am now looking forward to this exciting and important new role, helping drive forward the Group’s business at a crucial time.

Heath said: “I am grateful for the opportunity to edit one of the country’s finest newspapers and only hope I can do as good a job as Ian has done for so many years.”

Chris Evans, the Telegraph’s editor in chief and director of content, said: “Ian has been an outstanding editor of the Sunday Telegraph and, at a time of renewed assaults on journalism, takes on his crucial new role with our thanks and blessing.

“I am extremely pleased to have a journalist of Allister’s dynamism, talent and experience to replace him.”

The Sunday Telegraph has a total UK circulation of 347,394 copies per issue, according to ABC figures to January this year.

Picture: Telegraph

Comments

2 thoughts on “Allister Heath appointed new Sunday Telegraph editor as Ian MacGregor takes on 'emeritus' role”

    1. Famous remark attributed to Rupert Murdoch, after he elevated Andrew Neil’s predecessor as editor of The Sunday Times to the new post of Editor Emeritus.

      Q: “What does it mean?”

      A: “It’s Latin, Frank. ‘E’ is for ‘exit’, and ‘meritus’ means you deserve it.”

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